RAINBOW BEACH, QUEENSLAND. AUSTRALIA

If you embark on this breathtaking adventure, you’re destined to pass through a stunning coastal town called Rainbow Beach, and yes, it’s as alluring as it sounds. Once you get a taste of Rainbow Beach’s unique, homely charm you’ll be left wanting more and it’s not uncommon to overhear visitors exclaiming, “I wish I could live here!”




Unlike people I know, I have been going to Rainbow Beach since the early 90’s and experienced many changes in the area, some good, but a lot bad. I watched in the early 90’s when the camping area was swallowed by and big sink hole. I got to drive the rough dirt road to get to the point compared with today’s bitumen road.  You could enjoy the peace and quiet and enjoy great fishing. You took trips to collect some coloured sands and climb the Cherry Venture. 





Now days there are rubbish littered everywhere at the campgrounds. P Plate drivers roaring over the sands. People looting camping equipment and erosion destroying the coloured sands. No longer a place for peace and quiet.




It’s a stunning drive and there’s much to explore, so my best piece of advice is; don’t rush it. Pull over at Double Island Point, a popular day-trip destination for Sunshine Coast locals. Roll out that picnic blanket and soak up some sunshine then walk off your meal with a stroll to the headland to enjoy an incredible 360-degree view.



Once you reach Rainbow Beach you’ll be starving. Arcobaleno On The Beach is a local town favourite. This gorgeous Italian restaurant offers up a great courtyard and lovely atmosphere. The staff are all locals and do a great job of serving crispy wood-fired pizzas and delicious pasta every day of the week.




When we holiday at Rainbow we normally stay at Debbie’s Place. Debbie’s Place offers luxurious and tranquil self­ contained and motel­ style accommodation in the heart of Rainbow Beach. With affordable one, two and three­ bedroom suites to choose from, each self­ contained unit comes equipped with your own private veranda surrounded by lush, tropical gardens. Self­ contained suites also possess kitchen and dining facilities or if you prefer, an array of restaurants and shops are just a short stroll away. We pick this place because they offer us a special self contained room so we can take our dog.


 We always visit to the Carlo Sand Blow, which is a must for everyone staying at Rainbow Beach. This iconic sand mass provides great views of the coloured sands, Double Island Lighthouse and Inskip Peninsula. When you visit at sunrise or sunset you capture some amazing photographs.

If you feel like exploring more of Great Sandy National Park, make Seary’s Creek your final resting point. The creek is beautifully clear, with subtle orange, tea-tree tannins. You can float or play in the water, read a book in the shade, or stroll along the picturesque boardwalk.

Experience something truly unique and ride a horse along Rainbow Beach. All riding experience levels can be catered to and you can choose between a beach ride, country ride, even a full moon ride!






From Rainbow Beach, you’re in prime position to explore the world’s largest sand island,  Fraser Island. There are many great day tours on offer, like the Fraser Island Discovery Tour, which will take you on an adventurous 4WD excursion up the beach to Inskip Point where you’ll board a barge and cross over to the iconic island.

Spend the afternoon walking through cool, towering rainforest, swimming in freshwater lakes or watching dingoes explore their native habitat.




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NORTH WEST ISLAND, QUEENSLAND. AUSTRALIA

This was some time ago and I had to search for my photos (Was hard to find all of them). But in a recent conversation with friends the subject of your favorite beach camping site was put up. The usually answers of Fraser Island, Moreton Island, Stradbroke Island, Kangaroo Island, Magnetic Island, Lord Howe Island and even Tassie was put forward, which got a laugh. I threw a spanner in the works, because unlike my friends and people I recently meet, I have been and Kim has been camping for years. Kim’s memory of every year camping at Dicky’s Beach then Mooloolaba and me calling Inskip my second home for years. I’ll put the secret out, that if you truly want to experience a real Robinson Crusoe island, then my time at North West Island was the greatest ever camping experience.


I had always dreamed of holidaying on a deserted island, living off the land, snorkelling all day and sleeping under the stars by night. In all honesty I never expected a place like that existed, fortunately for me, it does. Located 75km off the coast of Gladstone is the most beautiful place I have visited,  North West Island.


This remote 100-hectare coral cay is one of the southern islands in the Great Barrier Reef. Home to rare species of flora and fauna, this spectacular spot will capture your heart from the second you lay eyes on it. For me, that moment came after a long barge trip. After spending most of the trip asleep at the back of the barge, I got up and walked to the front and from a distance saw the white sand of North West Island.


As I stepped off the barge and into the warm water, I knew I had found paradise. But in reality even paradise has its barriers to overcome. For starters, I am the sort of person who is used to creature comforts and in my dreams of living on a deserted island, I never imagined it would be such hard work.

With no running water, we showered in the salt water which meant by the end of the week my hair was like straw and I couldn’t get my brush through it. If you ever go to a place like North West Island make sure you pack conditioner and every evening put it through your hair.

It doesn’t fix the problem or stop knots from forming but it stops dreadlocks. As well as bathing in the sea water, we washed our dishes and clothes and caught our food in the Pacific Ocean.

When you are living on an uninhabited island, you must do everything for yourself and in some cases go without. There was so much to see and do on the island; at times its beauty was overwhelming.



Snorkelling was high on my list as was photographing the creatures which called the island home. It was about a half a kilometer walk out to the reef drop-off zone. The walk was the scariest and most beautiful experience I had on the island.

For most people who don’t think about accidentally stepping on a stone fish or cone shell, it is a relaxing and peaceful walk, but for me, every step felt like an aquatic form of Russian roulette.




Snorkelling on the reef should have scared me more, swimming with stingrays, jellyfish and sharks. But floating on the surface, diving down to snap a photo, of green turtles, coral, fish, sharks and stingrays wasn’t that frightening.




The only time I got worried was when a few spear fishermen came too close to us and the water became bloody. As clichéd as it will sound, the sharks that had been casually circling below me slowly made their way up higher. I am no shark wrestler, so that was my cue to exit the water.




There were many firsts on the island, from seeing green turtles up close to watching the sunset and sunrise over the ocean, so many amazing experiences.



I saw the sun go down six times and each time it was just as magical as the first. By day, when I wasn’t laying on a blow-up lounge a couple of metres from shore making shell necklaces from the white shells that covered the beach or fishing to catch my dinner, I was photographing the beautiful birds which inhabited the island or documenting the male green turtles fighting for a female to mate with.



At night the moon lights the way and you can watch as turtles mate on the shoreline, or just wander around on the secluded beach, listening to the waves lapping on the shore. It takes about two hours to walk the circumference of the island and it is worth the effort.

North West Island is beautiful and untouched. Its blue green waters are cool and refreshing, its birds and turtles abundant. It makes a wonderful holiday for those of us who like to get back to basics, who love the smell of the ocean and marvel at the underwater world.


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TEEWAH BEACH, QLD AUSTRALIA

This magical stretch of beach close to Brisbane is known for its accessibility to anyone with a 4X4 – including nervous mums and Vespa-riding teens
Where else can you dodge sandcastles, watch whales and get bogged in the sand all in the same day. Teewah Beach in Queensland, Australia, stretches for over 40 miles, with the Pacific Ocean crashing on one side and multi-coloured dune formations towering on the other. Most normal roads don’t tend to have kids with buckets and spades digging holes in the middle of them


For all the reasons above, Teewah Beach is our go-to magic spot. It’s an easy two-hour drive north of Brisbane up the Bruce Highway and once over the Noosa River Ferry, within minutes you’re looking out over the southern end of Teewah and the beginnings of the Great Sandy National Park..
Teewah Beach extends from Double Island Point in Cooloola, Gympie Region through Noosa North Shore in the Shire of Noosa to the Noosa River in Queensland, Australia. It is part of the Great Sandy National Park.

For much of its length it is a designated road under Queensland government legislation. It is subject to the same laws governing speeding, drink driving and wearing a seatbelt. For 4WD enthusiasts, the beach provides an access way to Rainbow Beach and Fraser Island.


But as locals know, the use of the beach by 4WD enthusiasts is a contentious issue. Many environmentalists see the 4WD car as a factor in the degradation of beach eco-systems. Others see it as their only means of experiencing a wilderness area and good fishing. Road safety issues remain a concern, however, with numerous accidents and fatalities each season, many involving tourists who are not accustomed to the hazards of driving on a beach.

One of the most spectacular views comeS from the Teewah Coloured Sands – a stretch of sand cliffs along Teewah Beach within Noosa North Shore. The cliffs are up to 200 metres in height and the sand is in a range of colours, created through natural combinations of iron oxide and vegetable dyes.

The Leisha Track connects the Rainbow Beach side to the Teewah Beach side and is often tricky to access with overhanging sticks impeding entry. Tides play a vital role in enabling movement along this stretch and as a general rule sightseers should plan their travel no later than 2 hours either side of low tide.


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